Legal Issues

Toxicology tests show that Vermont driver Joseph A. Marshall, 17, had 36 nanograms of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, in his system during the April 26 crash that took his life and the life of a bicyclist. (screen shot/WPTZ)
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Marijuana blamed in teen's double-fatal crash

Jul 3, 2015

 

PennLive -   A Vermont teenager who was behind the wheel in a double-fatal crash that claimed his life and took the life of a bicyclist was under the influence of marijuana at the time of the incident, USA Today is reporting.

The investigative report containing this information on the two-month-old crash was just released by the Hinesburg Community Police. The records were first obtained by the Burlington Free Press, which purchased the accident report after filing a public-records request with the Department of Motor Vehicles, USA Today notes.
 
The records show that driver Joseph A. Marshall, 17, had 36 nanograms of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, in his system during the April 26 crash, USA Today reports, adding:
 
Under Vermont law, drivers are presumed to be under the influence with "any measurable amount" in their systems, Police Chief Frank Koss wrote in his report.
 
Koss noted "for additional reference" Colorado and Washington, where recreational marijuana is legal, both have set a presumptive limit of 5 nanograms.
 
That would have placed Marshall more than seven times over the legal limit in the two states that allow people to smoke pot.
 
Background:
 
Marshall was speeding when his 1993 Honda Civic hatchback struck and killed bicyclist Richard Tom, 47, of Hinesburg. The car and bike went down an embankment where the car crashed into a tree.
 

“If you choose to consume, please do so responsibly.” 

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